Wednesday, April 28, 2021

SHINY NOSE synopsis

LOGLINE

When a little girl’s mother dies of cancer, a Christmas reindeer makes the world a brighter place. 


PITCH

As a copywriter for Chicago’s Montgomery Ward, Robert May drafts an original Christmas story about a reindeer. In the wake of the Great Depression, he tries to write something hopeful with holiday cheer. Although his boss is wary of a story about a “shiny” red-nosed reindeer named Rudolph, Robert’s daughter, Barbara, is comforted through the tale when her mother dies of cancer. In time, the story becomes a best seller, and it’s even adapted into a very famous Christmas song and franchise.


SYNOPSIS

In 1939, when Robert May, a Montgomery Ward copywriter, decides to write a poem about a reindeer with a shiny nose, he hopes the world will become a brighter place. Many families could still feel the effects of the Great Depression. Instead of making the annual coloring book, Robert drafts an original Christmas story about an animal with holiday cheer. After all, his daughter, Barbara, loves reindeer, especially with Santa Claus and his sleigh. Although Sewell Avery, CEO of Montgomery Ward, is doubtful that the poem about a reindeer is the best idea, he approves Robert to write the piece. With the original name Rudolph, Robert sets off on brainstorming for the story. Coming home from work that evening, Robert sighs at the tiny, unkept two-bedroom Chicago apartment. He checks on his bedridden wife, who had been suffering from cancer for the past two years. He explains he’s been working on his poem about Rudolph the reindeer all day again. His wife hopes his writing is a big hit with the shoppers, and his daughter runs to him to hear the latest version of the story. Although his daughter Barbara is sad that her mother is sick, she finds joy in her father’s reindeer story. 

 

As Robert reads to his daughter at bedtime about a reindeer named Rudolph with a very shiny nose, she falls asleep. Later in the week, Mr. Avery agrees to consider drawings of Rudolph from Denver Gillan from the company art department. Robert tells Mr. Avery that he’ll spend the whole weekend at the zoo with Denver. When Saturday morning comes, Barbara goes with her father and the artist to the zoo to make drawings of deer. Unfortunately, Barbara’s mother is too sick to accompany them. The next week, Robert sits at his desk, scribbling on pads of paper and throwing them in the trash can. As he stares out the window, he cannot see through a thick fog from Lake Michigan. He realizes that Rudolph’s nose can shine like a spotlight through the fog on Christmas Eve, so Santa can make his deliveries. While at work, when the phone rings, and Robert hears his wife’s mother on the phone, he feels sick to his stomach. He sobs on the way to the hospital, trying to figure out how to tell his daughter that her mother has passed away. When he lays eyes on his daughter, she cries and cries and collapses in his arms, kicking and yelling. He tries to tell her about Rudolph, but she says he’s not real; he’s only a stupid reindeer. 

 

After his wife’s funeral, Mr. Avery insists that Robert doesn’t have to finish the Rudolph poem. Although Mr. Avery suggests he takes a couple weeks off, Robert insists on finishing it. He wants to finish the story for Barbara. After a few more weeks of writing, Robert bursts through his apartment door one evening and announces he has finished the story about Rudolph. His daughter is so pleased and thinks her mother would enjoy the story. By Christmas, 2.4 million copies of the poem are distributed to Montgomery Ward shoppers to great success. Rudolph is almost as important as Santa Claus, making the world a little brighter after all.


Copyright 2022 Jennifer Waters

CANDY CANE TWIST synopsis

LOGLINE

A high school choir dances the ballet at Christmas, and everyone sings hallelujah!


PITCH

The Hallelujah Chorus meets The Nutcracker at Head of the Class Middle School. Forte Piper, the school’s choirmaster, pops candy canes in the mouth of any student who complains about dancing the ballet as part of the chorus’ annual performance. When the students plot against their teacher to save themselves from public humiliation at the holiday concert, they temporarily save their reputations until Mr. Piper vows to make them dance the ballet at next year’s performance.


SYNOPSIS

This year is about to be different at Head of the Class Middle School in Hoboken, New Jersey. Choirmaster Forte Piper is combining singing with ballet in the annual Christmas concert. Breaking new ground, he’s planning The Hallelujah Chorus meets The Nutcracker. Mr. Piper is famous for popping candy canes into the mouths of students if they are caught talking in the middle of choir practice. He keeps a handful of candy canes with him at all times, ready for anyone babbling. In case he needs to pull someone off stage, he uses a shepherd’s crook, which looks like a huge candy cane. During the first choir practice of the year, the students in the choir are in stupendous fright at the thought of the entire school seeing them embarrass themselves in a ballet-chorus routine. Drummer Harp, Griff Gig, Mandolin Sonatina, and Seraphine Viola each got candy canes popped in their mouths for complaining to Mr. Piper. Griff’s candy cane accidentally went into his nose first. Despite their complaints to Mr. Piper, he says they are starting their first vocal-ballet practice the next day. He asks them to come prepared with a tutu. 

 

In attempt to protect their reputations, the four soloists pass the word to the rest of the chorus members to go along with Mr. Piper’s choir practice until the December 14th performance night. Almost every day, Mr. Piper charges the students to do pirouettes, and the students wish they had signed up for band or orchestra, where they could practice musical talent. Finally, when performance night arrives, Mr. Piper is successfully pulled off stage with his candy cane crook and locked in the music closet. After kicking and apologizing, Mr. Piper slumps on the floor in the closet in tears. Drummer explains to the crowd that Mr. Piper wasn’t feeling well, but the choir will sing on. 

 

After several holiday selections, Mr. Piper brakes out of the closet and runs across stage in a tizzy in his hideous tutu. The audience laughs as though it is a joke, and so it is, but it is also the best choral performance in the history of Head of the Class Middle School, and it never involves one bit of ballet dancing for the choir. Mr. Piper bows in his tutu, throwing candy canes to the crowd in good cheer. Next year, the choir will be doing a ballet with singing, Mr. Piper scolds and informs the parents. As the choir members mumble that they will be trying out for sports team instead, Mr. Piper considers that they could just take a field trip to the New York City Ballet instead. The students once again pull him off stage with his own candy cane shepherd’s crook.


Copyright 2022 Jennifer Waters 

THE CHRISTMAS WOODCUTTER synopsis

LOGLINE

When a woodcutter’s daughter gives the Christ child her bed on Christmas Eve, she will never forget him.  


PITCH

A little child visits a woodcutter’s home in France on Christmas Eve. After being welcomed by the family to warm himself at their hearth, Marie, the woodcutter’s daughter, offers the child her bed for the night. She sleeps on the kitchen bench instead. After a restless night’s sleep, Marie and her brother Valentine find the little child—who reveals himself as the Christ child—singing with angels. The child then plants a fir branch that shoots into the sky, and he disappears. The woodcutter’s children promise to remember the Christ Child and what they learned that Christmas Eve, even if no one else believes them. 


SYNOPSIS

A little child freezing in the cold on Christmas Eve knocks on the ice and snow covered kitchen window of the home of a poor woodcutter in Fourc├ęs, a small town in France. Valentine, the woodcutter’s only son, invites the child to sit by the fire. Marie, the woodcutter’s younger daughter, wipes the snow off the child’s face. The wife of the woodcutter warms the last of their supper stew for the boy. The boy thanks the family, nibbling on day-old bread from their table. The mother pours the child the last of their milk from their icebox, hoping the family cows would give more in the dawn.

 

Then, Marie insists that the little child sleep in her bed for Christmas Eve night. Instead, she will sleep on the kitchen bench made by her father. As the family settles into their beds, Marie drifts to sleep on the hard bench with one pillow and blanket. Trying to sleep, she watches the snow out the window with a shooting star drifting into the distant night sky. Marie asks aloud hours later if anyone hears the singing and the harps, sitting up, wondering if she had a dream. Valentine slips into the kitchen to peer through the window, and the children realize they have been visited by angels who are dressed in silver robes with golden harps and lutes. While the cherubim and seraphim sing, a group of children gather beside them also appearing in silver robes. Then, Marie and Valentine turn to see the little child standing next to them in a golden robe and crown. He opens the front door of the poor woodcutter’s home in the breaking dawn and snaps a bough from a nearby fir tree. Amidst the excitement, the woodcutter and his wife hurry to the front porch with their rifle.

 

After a moment to realize what was happening, the woodcutter and his wife fall to their knees in reverence. The angels and children continue to sing and dance on the early Christmas morning in the French countryside. With jubilation, Marie and Valentine join the other children in their celebration, making merry music. The Christ Child plants the bough of this fir tree deep into the ground. Then the child who was also God disappears into the early morning air. The fir branch shoots into the sky, growing into a full fir tree, decorated with golden apples, silver nuts, and wooden toys. Marie and Valentine take the gifts from the tree and deliver them to the other homes in the town. Marie tells her brother that they must never forget what just happened, even if no one believes them. Marie pinches herself, saying that she knows that the Christ Child is real because she gave him her bed, and the bench was very hard for the night. To this day, children everywhere decorate Christmas trees in honor of the little child, remembering the faithfulness of the woodcutter and his family.


Copyright 2022 Jennifer Waters

CHRISTMAS CRACKERS synopsis

LOGLINE

A wedding cake baker puts magical romantic notes in Christmas sweets and finds lasting love for himself and everyone else.


PITCH

Tom Smith gets more than he bargained for when his own magical love notes enchant a customer in his wedding cake shop into falling in love with him. After reading the note in her Christmas cracker, she wants to marry him and eat wedding cake for the rest of her life. His wedding cake shop becomes known as a place where romantic messages for his customers prove true. His Christmas crackers are a worldwide phenomenon!


SYNOPSIS

Tom Smith, a wedding cake baker from Clerkenwell, London, loves Christmas crackers. His wedding cakes sit delicately in his shop window on fine china, decorated with colorful icing. Waiting for his own true love, he just keeps baking wedding cakes. In the year 1847, he introduces his crackers, which crackle like logs put on a fire in a twist of paper. Then one day, an elegant customer walks in the shop and announces that she has found a wedding cake for when she gets married. Mr. Smith asks when the wedding date is, so that the cake is finished on time. She explains that she’s not engaged yet, but she will be very soon when she finds the right man. Mr. Smith sighs, handing her a brochure of his cake designs. The lovely woman takes samples of chocolate wedding cake from the counter. 


Then, she inquires as to the other samples, and Mr. Smith explains that those are his Christmas crackers. Since his bonbons slumped in sales, he put love messages in his sweets. Believing that she needs all the love messages that she can get, she grabs a handful. Mr. Smith says he’s considering putting jewelry and toys in some of them instead of sweets for fun. He thinks that expanding the merchandise might increase business. She opens her first cracker with a pop. At first Mr. Smith says he called the crackers ‘cosaques’ after the noise from Cossack’s whips, but he later decided on Christmas crackers. Reading the love note in her Christmas cracker, the brunette woman gasps, looking up at Mr. Smith. She whispers out loud: “You’ve just met your true love.” Mr. Smith stammers and scratches his head. He tells her not to take the fortunes on the love notes too seriously. Before Mr. Smith could say anything else, his mystery customer throws her arms around him and kisses him. She asks him to marry her, and she says that she’ll take every wedding cake in his shop for the rest of her life.

 

At first, Mr. Smith tries to fight back, but after a moment, he figures there is no use in fighting with a gorgeous woman who loves his sweets. Christmas crackers! Mr. Smith cheers, kissing her back. He asks her to be his Mrs. Smith. She says “of course” and takes a handful of cake and smashes it in his face and hair. He takes a handful of cake and smashes it in her face and hair as well, and they both look radiant. So, Mr. and Mrs. Smith live happily ever after with wedding cakes and love all around them. Their shop becomes known as a magical place where romantic messages read by customers prove true every time, even if there are a few bumps along the way. Each year at Christmas, Christmas crackers sell in the millions all over the world because of their lasting love.


Copyright 2022 Jennifer Waters

THE POHUTUKAWA TREE synopsis

LOGLINE

A heartbroken girl visits a mystical Christmas tree on a New Zealand cliff with enchanted nearby caves when her mother dies. 


PITCH

Following the shadows, Amelia Brown and her father venture into a legendary cave during a visit to Cape Reinga in New Zealand with its famed Pohutukawa tree. Looking for the spirit of her recently deceased mother, Mr. Brown tells his daughter about the warrior Tawhaki who fights to avenge unjust deaths. Many people think that the caves have become a conduit between heaven and earth where Tawhaki travels while helping people on their journey to the afterworld. 


SYNOPSIS

Eight-year-old Amelia Brown watches shadows pass by the caves near the cliff of Cape Reinga in New Zealand with her father. He explains that she is probably seeing the spirit of the warrior Tawhaki who is known to visit the caves. Although she is sad that her mother has recently died, her father says that he is glad that he is able to spend the day with her. Amelia tears up, wiping her nose on his jacket sleeve. The wind blows hard against the Pohutukawa tree that clings to the cliff of Cape Reinga in New Zealand. Caves wrap around the cliff, where it is said that people visit before they passed into the spirit world to heaven. 

 

As Amelia and her father walk near the cliff, her father tells her the legend of the warrior Tawhaki. As the story goes, the famous Pohutukawa tree emerged from the cliff of Cape Reinga in New Zealand on Christmas Eve. Its burning red flowers are said to symbolize the blood of a warrior who died attempting to avenge his father’s death. His name was Tawhaki. The warrior tried to get help in heaven on his mission, and then he fell to earth, causing the red flowers to bloom. He still roams the earth, trying to avenge his father’s death. He hates injustice and secretly tries to bring justice to those in need of it. He also helps people on their journeys from earth to heaven through the caves near the cliff. 

 

When Amelia and her father descend deep into the caves, Amelia comes face to face with the spirit of her mother. She looks at her father, wondering if he can see her. Realizing that he cannot, she says nothing. Her father chides Amelia, saying they couldn’t find her mother in the caves. Meanwhile, the spirit of Amelia’s mother bends over and kisses her cheek. It burns like fire, and Amelia is sure it is real. Then, her mother does the same to Amelia’s father, but he doesn’t feel the fire on his cheek. Amelia’s mother slowly takes off her diamond wedding ring and slips it into Amelia’s hand. Her mother disappears into the cave. While leaving the caves, Amelia decides that telling her father that she just saw her mother’s spirit might not help him at all, but it helped her more than she could say. Her mother’s wedding ring bounces deep in her pocket, although it’s too big to fit on any of her fingers. The winds blow hard, and the Pohutukawa tree shakes as a shadow falls from its branches. The shadow follows the Browns back to their house. No one would ever know all the healing that Tawhaki brought to them already, but maybe it is best that way until more justice can be revealed as to the untimely death of Mrs. Brown.


Copyright 2022 Jennifer Waters

THE MANGER ON FIFTH AVENUE synopsis

LOGLINE

A New York City window designer goes looking for the missing baby Jesus at Christmas. 


PITCH

New York City window designer Alan Wiseman creates a Living Manger for Saks Fifth Avenue customers to enjoy. Things go a bit haywire when the Little Drummer Boy goes missing, and then so does the baby Jesus. After a New York City Police Department Officer arrives to find the Christmas infant, a plastic baby is used as a stand-in until he can be replaced with a real human. After the infant’s mother apologizes for breast feeding her son in the bathroom, a living baby Jesus returns to his straw bed. His mother promises to stick to a breast feeding schedule, and when the animals arrive from the zoo, the window goes live for the public. It’s the best Christmas ever!


SYNOPSIS

Alan Wiseman, a famous Saks Fifth Avenue window designer, is trying to build a magical manger—complete with a real baby, live animals, and an actual child drummer—but he’s come up against a lot of havoc. After hours of planning and arranging, the Little Drummer Boy actor has gone missing. Shoppers on the street stop to watch his bewilderment in the window, wondering what could be going wrong. The Living Manger window display is about to premiere at any moment as soon as Alan can finish it. Every holiday season, the New Yorkers gather outside the windows on Fifth Avenue to celebrate the season. Not only is Alan famous for his window displays, but also his portrait photography, which his wife Susan loves the most. Often, Susan is the subject of his photography, especially when he wants to practice new techniques. He has many famous clients in his photos, including models and actors, and he has traveled the world, documenting other cultures. The holidays, however, are his busiest season, with Christmas and Hanukkah themes in his window designs. 

 

When all seems lost, the Saks Fifth Avenue manager pulls the Little Drummer Boy by his ear back into the window display, saying he found the boy running through the jewelry department. Alan begs the little boy to stand in one place and keep drumming because everyone is watching. Then, just when it seems that things calm down, Ewelina, Alan’s assistant, realizes that the baby Jesus has gone missing. After she tells Alan the bad news, she thinks that maybe the baby was kidnapped and calls to make a police report. As the New York City Police Department Officer arrives with his gun and badge, Alan grows more frantic. As the police officer searches for the real baby, Ewelina gets a plastic baby from the toy section as a stand-in. Next to the Living Manger, Saks Fifth Avenue features Alan’s Silver Hanukkah Star and Golden Dreidel Windows. He also has a Snow Castle Window, a Santa Workshop Window, and New Year’s Eve Gala Window. 

 

Just when Alan is about to close the Living Manger, the mother of the missing baby walks into the window. She apologizes and says she was breast-feeding him in the women’s bathroom. Alan asks the mother to stick to a very strict feeding schedule. As a compromise, Alan decides she will join the cast as Mary. Ewelina grabs the people near her and adds them to the display in outfits, complete with a Joseph, Wise Men, and Shepherds. Later in the afternoon, when the animals are all in place with pooper scoopers at hand, the window goes live! Then Alan’s phone rings, and it’s his proud wife on the line.


Copyright 2022 Jennifer Waters

 

SANTA CLAUS SCHOOL synopsis

LOGLINE

Twelve students enter a Saint Nick merry-making boot camp and learn to be the good in the world. 


PITCH

Santa Claus School in Santa Claus, Indiana, prides itself on graduating the best Santa Clauses in the nation. More than money-making ventures, Clement Winter, the school’s teacher, wants his students to have real Christmas spirit. Despite their less-than-merry attitudes, he teaches them all the crucial skills for becoming the “real Santa Claus.” By the time his class graduates its 10-week Santa Boot Camp, his 12 students are ready for a very Merry Christmas indeed. 


SYNOPSIS

Every September, Santa Claus School in Santa Claus, Indiana, welcomes twelve students who want to improve their holiday-making skills as men in the merry-red coats and hats with white beards. Although the applications come through the U.S. mail, and they are scrutinized for the best Christmas-cheer, Clement Winter, the school’s teacher, can never be too sure what to expect on the first day of school. The ten-week class covers all the basics and then some on how to uphold the tradition of Santa Claus. More than any other school in the country, Santa Claus School prides itself in graduating the best Santa Clauses. The school has been having financial troubles, so Clement hopes the students’ successes help it stay afloat. Looking at the new class, he feels saddened at their lack of enthusiasm. It takes a certain amount of gusto and Christmas values to pull off being a genuine Santa Claus. 


As Clement proceeds, he looks up to hear snoring, burping, and cursing from the students, and he takes radical action. “This year we’re running class like Boot Camp!” he announces, astounded that many of the students have not shaved their brown stubble. One student is hiding a Vodka bottle in his bag. One of them even picks his nose. Another one won’t turn off his cell phone and keeps taking calls from his various girlfriends. A handful of them try to budget how much money they can make during the holiday season if they keep on track, even attempting to get free gifts. On the contrary, a few of them read their Bibles openly and pray during class, ignoring Clement altogether. 

 

Clement makes a new rule, saying that the students either get themselves to the classroom by 6 a.m. ready to go, or they’re gone. By the end of Week One, Santa Claus School starts to look a little more like Christmastime. By the end of Week Two, each of the students finally have their own outfits, and only one of the Santas rips his pants when he bends over. As Week Three rolls around, the men have to learn to sing, talk, dance, and walk like Santa Claus. Week Four and Week Five are not so much different, being that children skills are similar to reindeer skills. During week six, learning how to interact with Mrs. Claus might be the toughest week of all. Although Week Seven with flying lessons takes more imagination than the practicality of making toys and letter-writing in Weeks Eight and Nine, Week Ten covering the true meaning of Christmas is the best. By the end of the ten-week course, the twelve Santa students graduate with hopes of presenting the best of Santa Claus to the rest of the world. From the elementary schools to the malls, they are now ready.


Copyright 2022 Jennifer Waters


THE MOST SILENT NIGHT synopsis

LOGLINE
When mice and a flood destroy a church organ, a priest writes a new carol for his Christmas Eve service.

PITCH

On a very silent Christmas Eve in Salzburg, Austria, Father Joseph discovers mice chewed through the bellows in his organ. Flooded water also made the organ parts icy. So, the priest writes a new song on the guitar with the help of a nearby schoolteacher, inspired by a sickly child that he visited the day before. That evening at Christmas Eve Mass, the congregants love the new Christmas hymn and leave singing a joyful song, spreading to singers all around the world. 

 

SYNOPSIS

On a quiet Christmas Eve in 1816 in a church in Salzburg, Austria, it is a silent night for Father Joseph. The day before, he had visited a sick child in the Austrian countryside, reminding him of the Christ child. He prayed for peace and asked God to bless the family and their child amid the snowy winter hillside. A day later, when he tries to play his church organ, he discovers that mice have chewed through the bellows that are used to supply the instrument with wind. Although he tries to fix them, the music is stilled. Water from a nearby river has also flooded parts of the church and damaged organ parts, making them icy. He worries as he cleans up the water and mice droppings in the sanctuary. If he writes a new song, he considers that he could use the guitar instead of the organ for the Christmas Eve service. Then, maybe he could raise money at Christmas Eve Mass to replace the organ for the church. 

 

As he makes his way into his office, he thinks about the sickly baby he had met just yesterday. He sticks his pen in the ink jar on his desk and scribbles a batch of lyrics onto a crumpled piece of paper. He entitles it “My Yuletide Lullaby.” Considering that the new song needs music, Father Joseph runs off to his friend, a schoolteacher, Father Franz, in a nearby village church. Wondering how the music for Father Joseph’s song should sound, Father Franz takes the crumpled piece of paper from Father Joseph and begins to hum a melody while playing the guitar. As Father Joseph paces back and forth in Franz’s home, Franz finally finishes the music to the lyric. Father Joseph thinks the melody is gorgeous, with a tear in his eye. He says that the next time the mice eat the organ bellows in a flood, he’ll just know it is time to write another new song. 

 

At the midnight Mass, worried that the congregation will reject the new song, Father Joseph prays a silent prayer. While some congregants make nasty comments about the broken organ, two families of glovemakers whisper to each other about how thoughtful it is of Father Joseph and Father Franz to write a new song for Christmas. After giving extra Christmas Eve offerings to replace the broken organ, congregants go home in the dark singing the new standard to themselves. As legend has it, the song is only to be sung on Christmas Eve and not a minute too soon, offering a peaceful blessing in tumultuous times. Everyone needs a silent night, but most of all at Christmas.


Copyright 2022 Jennifer Waters

Friday, April 2, 2021

"Wind Chimes," A CHILDREN'S SONG

CHORUS:

Wind chimes sing me a song,

And I’ll sing it back to you. 

Wind chimes sing me a song, 

And I’ll sing it back to you. 

 

VERSE:

The rain falling on the leaves

Of a tree branch has a melody. 

(The rain falling on the leaves

Of a tree branch has a melody.) 

 

The frog on a lily in a pond

Skips the pads with a revelry.

(The frog on a lily in a pond

Skips the pads with a revelry.)

 

PRE-CHORUS

Nature has its own chorus. 

(Nature has its own chorus.)

It’s all right before us. 

(It’s all right before us.)

 

CHORUS:

Wind chimes sing me a song,

And I’ll sing it back to you. 

Wind chimes sing me a song, 

And I’ll sing it back to you. 

 

VERSE:

The birds chirping their words

At a window make a symphony. 

(The birds chirping their words

At a window make a symphony.) 

 

The gust blowing of the breeze

At your door causes cacophony.  

(The gust blowing of the breeze

At your door causes cacophony.)  

 

PRE-CHORUS:

The world has music for those who listen.  

(The world has music for those who listen.)

It makes your ears tingle and glisten. 

(It makes your ears tingle and glisten.) 

 

CHORUS:

Wind chimes sing me a song,

And I’ll sing it back to you. 

Wind chimes sing me a song, 

And I’ll sing it back to you. 

  

BRIDGE:

Dogs like to bark, and cats like to sigh.

Whales call to waves, and hawks like to cry.

(Dogs like to bark, and cats like to sigh.

Whales call to waves, and hawks like to cry.)

As the strings of a violin tuned precise,

The music of the air takes you high.

(As the strings of a violin tuned precise,

The music of the air takes you high.)

 

PRE-CHORUS:

Nature has its own chorus. 

(Nature has its own chorus.)

It’s all right before us. 

(It’s all right before us.)

 

CHORUS:

Wind chimes sing me a song,

And I’ll sing it back to you. 

(Wind chimes sing me a song,

And I’ll sing it back to you.) 

 

Wind chimes sing me a song, 

And I’ll sing it back to you. 

(Wind chimes sing me a song,

And I’ll sing it back to you.) 

 

Copyright 2021 Jennifer Waters